Posted On October 23, 2013 By In Apple News, Featured With 2105 Views

Apple’s iPad Air and iPad mini With Retina Display Hands-on Roundup

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Apple has unveiled a slew of new devices and software at a special event yesterday. The list include: iPad Air, iPad mini with retina display, Mac Pro and upgraded MacBook Pro. In the software department we have OS X Mavericks, iLife and iWork suites.

Here’s a round up of some of the hands-on/first impression of the new devices around the web:

Engadget:

The new iPad mini, with all of its Retina display goodness, is now official. Announced today at Apple’s “lot to cover” event, the new mini was one of the final products shown off at the show…. there is one glaring exception: the 2048 x 1536 Retina display, which amounts to 324 ppi. Compared to the original iPad mini that came out last year, this is a rather significant bump in pixel density, and we came away much more impressed with the mini as a result.

The Verge:

..there’s little doubt that the iPad Air is going to be even more powerful and much more portable than any previous 9.7-inch iPad. Both White and Space Gray iPad Airs look nice, the Space Gray slightly stealthier and the White a little more fun (and a little more prone to fingerprints, it looks like). They feel fast, though not noticeably different from the A7-powered iPhone 5S. Even despite a couple of surprising omissions, like a TouchID fingerprint sensor, this device deserves a new name: it feels completely different than the full-sized iPad once did. Apple’s clearly trying to turn the iPad Air into a full-size device you’re willing to take outside your home, and based on our first impressions we’d happily throw one in our backpacks today.

CNET:

That’s a surprisingly high starting price given that the first-generation iPad Mini debuted at $329. I guess Apple feels the new display is worth the hike. Incidentally, the old iPad Mini now gets a price slash to $299 for 16GB of storage.

The new tablet feels exactly like the first-generation iPad Mini. This is a good thing, since the first Mini has a near perfect feel.

However, while it feels great, it’s all about that screen. And given the Mini’s smaller 7.9-inch size, it looks even sharper than the full-size iPad Air. But to take advantage of the new pixel-dense screen, you will be paying up over last year’s Mini. It’s gorgeous, though, so I’d imagine the new premium will definitely be worth it to some people.

Mashable:

The computer disappears.

That has always been Apple‘s goal, and that is my first impression of the newer, lighter iPad Air. It’s pretty much the purest expression yet of an interactive screen, without anything to weigh you down or hold you back.

TechCrunch:

The most important thing about Apple’s iPad Air is the fact that it is now a one-handed device. Previous generations of the full-size 9.7″ iPad could not be held in a single hand for long periods of extended periodical reading or web browsing.

Mirror:

We called the iPad 4 Apple’s best full-size tablet yet and the iPad Air is even better. The main difference is its design. With a paper-thin chassis and weighing less than the original iPad Mini, it’s a design marvel.

The Retina screen remains one of the best screens on a tablet and this is now boosted by a blisteringly fast processor. The iPad Mini may be small but it can no longer play the thinner and lighter card and if you’re one for bigger is better then you won’t get much better than the new iPad Air.

On first impressions this is probably Apple’s best tablet yet.

GIGAOM:

Overall, the two new iPads have compelling new hardware components and features. The weight reduction of the iPad Air combined with an upgraded processor makes a good product much better. Adding the same chip and a new retina display to the iPad mini for just $70 more than last year’s model is a huge deal. I’ll have more to say after spending more time with both devices, of course. For now, I’m walking away from Apple’s event very impressed with the new iPads.

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Storm is a technology enthusiast, who resides in the UK. He enjoys reading and writing about technology.

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