Posted On July 2, 2013 By In Editorials, Featured With 1191 Views

Lessons Behind Xbox One and What It Means for iPhone and Other Mobile Users

Ever since the first iPhone was released back in 2007, the installed software has consistently received yearly updates for every new version that comes out. Apple has always been committed to rolling out pristine and seemingly flawless products, but the demand for more advanced features has made it a challenging prospect for the company.

Consumer response

When the iPhone 5 was first released to the public, complaints about Apple’s own Maps app began circling the web, leading to implementation of measures on how to fix the bug/s. If this were to happen a decade ago, you would need to wait months before a solution is made available to the public. These days, companies have no choice but to respond immediately to pressing issues, as it’s become apparent that the market is becoming more influenced by social trends on the Internet.

iTunes Radio

XBox One-80

The big news a few weeks ago was the reversal XBox made regarding the DRM and always-online policy Microsoft planned to implement when the console eventually comes out. Consumers and Internet activists took to the web to protest and voice out their opinion, including threats to completely abandon even earlier games and console versions.

It only took less than a week for the company to announce the removal of the controversial requirements. The aftermath has since become one of the most significant reflections of how consumer response directly influences the outcome of a planned release. Updates were actually made to the product even before it was sold to the public.

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Repairs and upgrades

Although video games and mobile phones seem to operate on totally different design philosophies, you can’t discount the fact that the technology inside them more or less run on computer programming, albeit on vastly different scales. In order to address errors, engineers would need to release updated patches that fix identifiable bugs.

Accredited suppliers

As a mobile user, this should give you assurance and confidence that you’ll get value for the price you paid on your unit. However, remember to be responsible enough to check if the supplier or repair shop is accredited by the brand of mobile phone you have. There have been reports of small shops offering services to repair iPhone issues, and it has resulted to loss of personal data files.

Your voice matters

The XBox fiasco proves that companies listen and respect the power of your voice on the Internet. Web culture has somehow demonstrated that it’s not just the press release and the announcements that would serve as promotion for the products. Videos and images of reviews will find their way to the screens of consumers, and social media tools such as Twitter and Facebook provide access to their corporate structure.

Eventually you’ll be upgrading your phone to a newer version as well, and it helps to be informed and prepared for where technology, web influence and consumer culture is headed to. Start with reading more about the corporate history of your preferred gadget brands, and maybe it could be your guide in determining which mobile brand to patronize.

[box title=”About the Author:” color=”#616161″]  Katherine Flowers is a technology blogger and a dedicated content writer working for Next Byte Apple Repair Service, an authorised Apple service provider in Australia.[/box]

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Contributor to TheTechStorm Blog.

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